2018 Awards Eligibility Post


It’s that time of year again! No, I’m not talking about Thanksgiving and Christmas trees and holiday shopping and carols. I’m talking about award nomination season in the science fiction/fantasy field, of course! I was pleased to publish six stories this year, and I truly believe that several of them are among the best I’ve ever written. I’d be honored if you took a look.

For Special Consideration

These four stories are already on the Nebula Reading List (thank you thank you to whoever put them there!) and they are special pieces of my heart. Also, please check out all the other stories on the Nebula Reading List; it’s a wonderful resource for us all.

"Wild Ones" in Bracken Magazine (fantasy, 2407 words)
A mother, a daughter, and the Wild Hunt.

--Featured in the Barnes and Noble Sci-Fi and Fantasy Blog, Sci-Fi and Fantasy Short Fiction Roundup: February 2018 by Maria Haskins. “A beautiful and poignant piece of short fiction that deals with longing and fear, adolescence and parenthood, and (bonus!) the magic of fall.”


--Recommended on novelist Stephanie Burgis’ blog. “This short story is so beautiful, and it really resonated for me. . . It’s a story about mothers and daughters, the challenge of letting go, and the choices that we make at all the stages of our lives.”


"Traces of Us" in GigaNotoSaurus (science fiction, 6523 words)


Sentient spaceships, neuroscientists in love, and a love letter to St. Louis (where I lived for some years)

--Featured in the recommendations column, X Marks the Story:March 2018 by Charles Payseur on The Book Smugglers blog. "It’s a healing and touching story that glows with the warmth of stars."

--Featured in The Best Short SFF-March 2018 on the blog The 1000 Year Plan. "A sci-fi story in the classic mold: big ideas, epic scope, and intimate detail somehow heroically squeezed into a tight space and told with nice touches of humor and pathos."

 --Featured in Maria Haskins' March 2018 Fiction Round-up. "Every sentence here glows with love – the love between two people, a love of science, and also love for St. Louis. So often, science fiction portrays technology as an ominous threat to humanity, but in this story, technology and science actually offer a glimpse of hope. It’s the kind of scifi I love: science-rich, yet intensely human."

--Featured by writer Jason Sanford in his March 2018 Reading Round-up. "A beautiful, touching science fiction story of two people embracing each other across eternity.

--Story notes here


"The Things That We Will Never Say" in Daily Science Fiction (science fiction, 1203 words)

A story of family, of navigating the future, and of all the words that go unsaid.


--Translated into Vietnamese and reprinted in the Vietnamese science fiction magazine, SFVN on Sept 30, 2018.

--Featured in Maria Haskins' fiction roundup, 10 (extra) spectacular speculative stories I read in May:"In the space of less than 2,000 words, Fogg fits in some amazing scifi world-building, creates characters that live and breathe and tug at your soul, but it’s what goes on beneath the surface, everything left unspoken, that will pierce you through and through."

--Featured by Merc Rustad in their June fiction round-up. "A poignant, moving story about family and silences and possible futures, some that are hopeful and true."


“The House of Illusionists” in Liminal Stories (fantasy, 7100 words)

A  story of war and survival and illusions, of both the power and limits of art. 

--Featured in the Barnes and Noble Sci-Fi and Fantasy Blog, Sci-Fi and Fantasy Short Fiction Roundup: August 2018 by Maria Haskins. “Fogg has crafted a beautiful, devastating tale about the power of hope and art in the face of oblivion, about the magic we choose to believe in so that we might be able to face the pain and horror of the world.”

--Recommended by writer G.V. Anderson in her 2018 in Review 

--Story notes here


Other Stories for Consideration


"The Young God" in Kaleidotrope (flash fantasy, 980 words)

--“Just a perfect little story”–SFRevu


Kitchen” (fantasy, 3879 words). Published in the Reading 5X5 anthology

A story of apocalyptic magic, family, and food. Lots and lots of food.

--See the official anthology website to learn about the concept behind this anthology (briefly, five stories told five ways by five authors), the charity to which sales proceeds are donated, and more! 

--Story notes here

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